Back in Tokyo, but this time on a more Blade Runner-ish side of the megalopolis (which had earlier made me think more of villages), two further food experiences still awaited me.
I still went for noodles (and tempura) for their relationship to chile pepper and sansho pungency, and so I went to Fuunji Ramen.

The Setting

This small ramen shop is another one of those mixtures that are so typical of Japan.

It is local, small, and not exactly stylish – and at the same time, highly-regarded, down-to-earth, but craftsman-like.
The selection is fittingly small; a ticket vending/buying machine awaits one’s order right inside the entrance.

The chef was busy and still attentive; the seating is along the kitchen ‘bar’ with a view of all the action – only my choice was bad, I am afraid.

The Food

Looking to try something a bit different – and something Fuunji Ramen is known for – I went for tsukemen. Tsukemen, that is the style of ramen that does not come in soup but with “soup” on the side into which the noodles are to be dipped (rather like the kama-age udon I had in Kamachiku and Omen).

Only that this soup was not just thick as it should be, they make it with soup powder – which is unfortunately reminiscent of (or the same as?!) the soup powder one gets with instant ramen – poured on its top.

And the noodles, bare as they lie there, the chicken side I’d ordered, as well as the soup – it was all barely lukewarm when it should not have been.
(There are cold noodle dishes, of course, but I am quite sure this should not have been one.)

So, the noodles were nicely done, perhaps, but the entire experience was more uncomfortable than it was delicious.

Well, bad choices happen; I should have tried something else. At least I think that this is what the problem was, not their entire cooking 😉

Basic Information

Fu-unji Ramen
(In Japanese: 風雲児)

Price range 1000-2000 JPY

Open Mo-Sa 11 am – 3 pm & 5-9 pm
Closed Sunday

Very few seats, expect a wait; no reservations.

Cash only; order/payment machine at entrance.